How Long Should Gear Last

Being comfortable in your gear could be the difference between the best day ever and the worst. And sometimes, it takes time to work that beloved jacket or pants into the point of fitting you in all the right places. Now, those favorite ski boots or even long underwear may be nearing the end of its life and it could be sooner than you think. Just how long should gear last?

Ski Socks-Approximately 1 year depending on the brand

According to Smartwool, their socks should last a year if the washing directions and fit are properly executed.

Tips to prolong life:

  • Avoid wearing on the carpet.
  • Do not use fabric softener.

Helmet- 1 Impact

This is debatable but generally speaking, if you have taken an impact on your helmet, experts suggest it’s time for a new one. This is because most helmets are designed to only withstand a certain amount of force in order to perform optimally

Tips to prolong life:

  • Don’t crash on your head. Duh.
  • Store away from factors that can alter the effectiveness of the materials. This includes heat and extreme cold.

Outerwear- Anywhere from a season to a lifetime

How long your outerwear lasts depends on how often it is being used, how well you take care of it and the material that it is made out of. Current technologies can see Gortex jackets lasting years and years, even lifetimes in some cases.

Tips to prolong life:

  • Wash them. Really it’s okay. The sweat and beer will degrade the waterproofing faster than an occasion spin cycle.

Goggles- A really long time

Goggles can last a really long time but that really depends on the quality purchased and the level of care given to maintain them.

  • When you get snow in your goggles, don’t brush it off with a jacket sleeve or glove. Snow is made with abrasive ice crystals that can actually scratch the lenses. Use a special cloth.

Ski Gloves- A season

Your gloves take quite the beating and it can be hard to maintain the durability as well as the waterproofness of the fabric.

  • Hang dry them out after each use.

Most ski gear can last more than a season but the key is to take really good care of it. With these helpful tips, you should be able to prolong the life of some of your most beloved items. If you’re finding that some of your gear needs an upgrade, come to McCoo’s. We can help sort you out so you won’t have to live through another ‘breaking in’ period and can go right to into wearing the most comfortable gear ever!

 

Fall Adventure Gear Guide

Fall in Whistler is considered a transitional season, meaning that we are sad summer is gone and can’t wait for winter get here. It may seem like a season that is forever spent anticipating what’s next but it is actually a great time to be outdoors. Hiking, biking, and adventuring are still possible but do require a bit more preparation with the variable conditions that accompanies the change in seasons. With autumn comes cooler days, rain and variable weather conditions that are sure to test your gear’s performance. We gathered up the best fall adventure gear so you can get out, have fun and get your mind off of waiting for snow!

Jacket

The consistency of summer has been left behind and in its place, fall with its unpredictable weather patterns has moved in. Don’t get caught in a rain storm or unseasonable cold winds- an Orage, Rip Curl or Oakley jacket will protect you from the elements and ensure that your adventure continues despite the weather!

Toque

Did you know most of the heat is lost through your head? Who are we kidding, we can’t confirm that fact but what we do know, is that it’s better and not wetter when your head is warm and dry! McCoo’s has got all the toques, in all the styles that are an easy transition from one season to the next. Did we mention toque season is the best season?

Socks

Wet feet can be the difference between a good time and a bad time. Stance socks not only look great but they are built for performance as well. Hook yourself up with a pair designed for snow and have warm tootsies until next year when your feet emerge from hibernation and are back in sandals again.

Action Cam

Summer is a bit more predictable- nice weather, bikinis, lake days, etc. But fall, who knows what fall is going to throw at you. Monsoons, wild winds, early snow… Okay, maybe we are exaggerating its wildness but whatever is going to happen, you’re going to want to catch it on camera. Get an action cam- either a GoPro, Contour or Ion camera and make everyone jealous of what a rad fall your having!

Tools

Always be prepared for the unexpected. Throw in an RC or a Bakoda tool in your backpack for leveling up on being prepared.

Base Layer

We haven’t decided if we love it or hate it yet, but it’s gotten cold. This may just be the ultimate limiting factor when getting outside and getting among all the autumn adventures. The best solution is to dress for the weather and a proper base later from Smart Wool or Kombi will help regulate your temperature.

Don’t make autumn a waiting game. With McCoo’s fall gear advice, there should be nothing stopping you from getting outside and enjoying all the adventures that you can before the snow arrives. If you pick your gear right, you’ll be getting ready for winter without even knowing it!

5 Tips for Staying Dry on the Mountain

We’re firm believers that there’s no such thing as bad weather, as long as you’re properly outfitted. We’ll admit, we’d choose a powder day over a day skiing in the rain, but when the only other option is to not ski at all, we’ll make the most of what we’ve got.

Here’s what you need to know to stay as dry as possible on the mountain, even when the weather isn’t cooperating.

Start Dry

It’s a no-brainer, but if you start your day off with wet gear, you’ll forego that warm and dry feeling right from the get go. If you’re skiing back to back days, make sure to lay out all your gear the night before to give it a chance to dry off. If you’ve got boot dryers, you’re well ahead of the game. If not, pull the liners out to give them a chance to dry off. You can also stick scrunched up newspaper into your boots to absorb moisture. If any of your clothing isn’t dry the morning of, toss it in the dryer.

Your Outer Layer is Everything

Your outer layer – the jacket and pants you wear on the outside of your gear – is your key to staying dry on the mountain. Your best bet is to choose pieces made of GoreTex – this is as waterproof as it gets. To keep your GoreTex gear in good shape, you’ll need to wash it every so often to keep the little pores clean. Take care of your gear, and it will take care of you.

Don’t Forget Accessories

Soaking wet gloves can ruin your day in a shockingly short amount of time. The good news is that they make GoreTex gloves, too. You might also want to squeeze an extra pair of mitts into your coat pocket: after lunch, you can simply swap out your gloves for the dry pair.

The other accessory you’ll want to make use of: a hood. When you’re picking out a jacket, look for one with a big, roomy hood large enough to accommodate your helmeted noggin. You’ll want to throw that hood up in lift lines and on chair lifts.

Stay Dry

Once you’re geared up with your waterproof stuff, don’t take it off! As soon as you take off your gloves or unzip your jacket, you’re exposing yourself to moisture. If you must, try to adjust your GoPro or text your friends somewhere sheltered to avoid getting soaked.

To Garbage Bag or Not to Garbage Bag

On a particularly soppy day, you might have seen people skiing by you wearing a very fashion-forward garbage bag poncho. If you don’t have good, waterproof gear, by all means – sport the garbage bag. However, it’s not very aerodynamic, it makes obnoxious flapping sounds, and it certainly is not breathable – and though studies are inconclusive, we’re not sure it does much for your style cred.